Fuel for Stories!

Zoomed back into childhood; that happened to me this week. I was ten years old sitting in the dickie seat (a seat inside the boot/trunk of a sports car) of my dad’s grey Triumph Roadster with my friend Margaret, our hair blowing in the wind, waving, usually the royal wave, and giggling at the reaction from passersby. We felt very important. Pictures from Classic cars

One perk of writing historical fiction is the research, it can be boring on occasions but, more often than not, it’s intriguing and like my research this week it brings back memories. How I came across 1949 Triumph Roadsters when I was actually researching British cars in 1917, is a bit of a puzzle, no matter, because I love the happy memories. 

The 1917 car information was for my current book Sophie (working title). Carlos, Sophie’s lost-recently-found love is taking her to dinner in his car, a Model T Ford. Now, in 1917 personal cars were few as the War Office commandeered them for war services and the men who were the drivers, although that was changing, were fighting the Great War. Fuel, that would be petrol, was scarce and pretty much impossible to find for personal use. Another interesting fact I discovered was that gas, (the vapour kind not the North American word for petrol) was used as fuel. They attached a large inflatable balloon to the roof of the car or van, which fuelled the vehicle for short distances, the limit was about 30 miles. Um… not sure I would want to be driving around with explodable gas sitting on my head! Pictures from  BBC Schools 

Back to Sophie, Carlos is now, an orthopaedic surgeon, for those of you who read Ruins in Silk, you’ll remember he worked for Sophie’s father; we will catch up with his past life as the story unfolds. As a practising doctor, he would have a car and a petrol allowance, for emergency calls. Perhaps not intended for taking a lady to dinner, but if an emergency arose at the hospital while dining, he would need transportation.

If you would like to join Susan’s Reader’s Group online and receive a gift of the e-book Ruins in Silk. Click here or if you would prefer to purchase either an e-book or print book Click here

Writing Updates: The article above updates the progress of Sophie this week. However, I have interesting news about the contemporary romance Love’s Endings and Beginnings – A sweet romance novel – Heartbreak to second chance romance. My wonderful editor Meghan Negijn has worked her magic on the manuscript. I will correct it this week, write the front and back matter, design the cover and have it ready for you in a few weeks. 

Books I’m Reading…. Fiction – I am on the final leg of Elizabeth George, a new Inspector Lynley and DS Barbara Havers, mystery. I am finding this book very different from Ms George’s other Lynley books. There is a mystery, but it isn’t the main focus of the story. The story is more about the characters, in particular, DCS Isabelle Ardrey. The characters are well developed and interesting but for a 690-page book, I think I would like more mystery. Just my thoughts on The Punishment She Deserves 

Nonfiction – Not much reading this week mostly Google searches.


Would you like to write? I hear this comment all the time. “I want to write a book?” But few people actually write. First Sentence to First Sale is an online writing course that helps you decide if writing is for you and gets you started on your writing journey.  Due for release soon, we’re a little behind schedule so please stay tuned Click here for details


The books are available at online retailers. Click the title, make your choice

The Blue Pendant Book I     Anna’s Legacy Book II    Sarah’s Choice Book III

First in series The Blue Pendant  on sale on  2.99 A perfect summer read 560 pages of reading pleasure

Anna’s Legacy and Sarah’s Choice E-book at all online retailers $4.99

Check out the synopsis on My Books page. A great Book club read.


A gift of an e-book Ruins in Silk prequel to the trilogy. A perfect summer afternoon read. And the opportunity to sign up for Susan’s Reader’s Group.  

“Her mother’s death sets a path of tragedy; betrayal, misguided love and even murder ” 

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2 thoughts on “Fuel for Stories!

  1. Margaret Southall

    I agree with you Sue, about how intriguing research can be when doing it for an historical novel.
    For me it is the bits of social history that don’t necessarily get into the history books, like your cars with gas balloon fuel, that really help create the atmosphere of a particular period of a novel.
    For instance, I just discovered that during the time period which I’ve been writing about, people who were for the abolition of slavery in Britain would often have their sugar bowls at tea parties they hosted inscribed that the sugar came from India and not the Caribbean. If you used Caribbean sugar you were viewed as supporting slavery because the plantations there were worked by slaves.
    I don’t know whether it is of interest to you and maybe you already know, but during WW1 people in Britain were so anti-German, they used to kick daschund dogs in the street because they originated in Germany. .

    Reply
    1. Susan A. Jennings

      Great comment thanks Margaret. I knew that the Brits changed the name of German Shepherd dogs to Alsation because of the German name but i didn’t know about Dachounds. Very interesting.

      Reply

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